Benedict Arnold and the Men of Newburyport: Following Their Footsteps

  • Museum of Old Newbury 98 High Street Newburyport, MA 01950

On the 19th of September, 1775, 1100 farmers, soldiers, merchants, teachers, laborers, and others gathered at Newburyport to leave on eleven ships for a secret, bold attack on Quebec City.  The expedition was led by Benedict Arnold, before he became the infamous turncoat, and the plan was concocted by Arnold and George Washington shortly after the Battle of Bunker Hill.  Had the plan worked, there likely would have been no Revolutionary War, and certainly 14, not 13, states in a new United States of America.

200 years later, in 1975, Newburyport held one of its biggest celebrations ever, reenacting that event.

240 years later, in 2015, Jack and Astrid Santos put their hiking boots on their feet, and their kayaks on their car, in an attempt to follow Arnold's trail through Maine.

Jack and Astrid followed the diary, maps, and stories of Newburyport soldiers - especially Jeremiah Wheelwright, the father of the man who built their home. They ended, like Arnold's army, in Quebec City, capping off a memorable march with a visit to The Ursuline Convent, America's oldest institution of learning for women in North America, and a place that figured prominently in Wheelwright family history.

Using pictures of their trip, framed by stories of that expedition, join us on April 13 to discover what they found...

This program is part of Mid-day History at the HIST, a series of talks designed to offer a refreshing twist to your typical lunch hour.  Bring your lunch, get away from the office or out of the house for a bit, and learn something new about your community.  
 
Members: Free   Non-Members: $5
Beverages provided

A view on the journey to Quebec City.

A fort on the way to Quebec City.

Quebec City